TPMS?

Submitted: Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 11:46
ThreadID: 143908 Views:1351 Replies:12 FollowUps:32
Wondering if anyone has recommendations for a good TPMS (tyre pressure management/monitoring system)?

Folks with first hand experience would be good to hear from.

Thanks.
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Reply By: qldcamper - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 12:17

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 12:17
I have a cheap one similar to those advertised for $99.00 these days.
It has a very slow update rate which is fine for knowing you dont have a very slow leak but not so good if you get a faster deflation.
Also check the sensor battery life, I have the valve stem sensors that I was a bit wary of having the extra weight swinging off the stem but that doesnt seem to be a problem but the 1632 batteries only last 4 or 5 months, that would be a problem if they were internal sensors.
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Follow Up By: Keir & Marg - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 12:32

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 12:32
I have an (Aldi) cheapy too, which has the sensors in the valve caps. It only has 4 sensors so I can't monitor the van tyre pressures. Before you buy, check the pressure range of the TPMS sensors, as the maximum pressure of mine is 44PSI and pressures higher than this will trigger the alarm, which is VERY loud. I can't put two of these sensors on the van when towing, as the LT tyres on the van are running at about 50PSI, outside the range of the sensors. If you want to monitor the van as well as the tug, I'd suggest a good quality unit which has a greater pressure range.
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Reply By: Kazza055 - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 13:21

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 13:21
I have the InnotechRV 10 Sensor Tyre Pressure Monitoring System which I purchased back in 2014.

With 10 sensors I can monitor all 8 road tyres plus the 2 spares.

Not the cheapest but does work fine without the need to add a repeater.

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Reply By: Rob A1 (SA) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 13:54

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 13:54
We've been using the wireless ProMata system for about 6 years now. Plus for us is it doesn't need a range extender to talk to the sensors on the camper, as well the remote head is solar powered and works a treat.

Rob
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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 14:22

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 14:22
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I have had several over the years which have saved me from destroying several tyres.
There are many choices of display types, some simple and some cluttered.
My final set on the Troopy was 'Mata C' by Promata. Designed for 4WD use, this simple model will only serve 4 tyres but is simple to install by inserting into a cigar-lighter socket. Another big feature is the ease of changing tyre pressure for varying track conditions.... it is done to all tyres at the same time by simply pressing a button after changing the pressure. And it will monitor pressures from 0 to 99 PSI.
I now have two sets of the Mata C, in the Sprinter and in the Aurion home car.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 14:41

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 14:41
Are the sensor batteries readily available and replaceable Allan?
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 15:39

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 15:39
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Yes Peter, batteries are CR1632, 3v lithium button cells.
Readily available at around $5 ea. The OEMs are Panasonic. (Says something about product quality).
Promata nominate "2 Year life". So, two coffees / year?
Replaceable by unscrewing cap with fingers. Battery slides in.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 15:46

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 15:46
You can get them on eBay for about $1.00 each. I normally replace them all about every 2 years.
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Follow Up By: Member - Siringo - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 10:49

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 10:49
That's great, thanks Allan. I had second thoughts on getting a TPMS as I remembered how you had to change the pressures on the TPMS whenever you changed the tyre pressures.

But that sounds not too difficult with that system you have.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 10:57

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 10:57
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Siringo, all that is needed to set pressure alarm point on the Mata C is to inflate/deflate all tyres to desired pressures then hold button until 3 beeps. Display will then show current tyre pressure for front-left and rear-left tyres. This equates to front axle and back axle which can be differing pressures. Then quick press on the button and the thresholds have been set at 25% above and below current tyre pressure. Simplest system I have seen.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Briste - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 16:36

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 16:36
I've got a Safety Dave unit, which is very popular in some quarters. Seems to work well. I haven't had a flat tyre in order to test it fully yet (perhaps I shouldn't have said that), but when I forget to reset the alarm settings after airing down it's been quick to tell me.

These units aren't super precise in my experience, so you wouldn't use them to fine-tune tyre pressures, but they're close enough for general monitoring, and the alarms seem to work, which is what I got it for.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 17:12

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 17:12
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Instrument precision???....... Now your'e talking my language.

These TPMS units are typically better than 2% accurate of full-scale value which is at least comparitive to your average tyre pressure gauge.
When you apply that to the range of tyre pressures that people adopt as their preferred value you may be looking at perhaps a 10% range of variation. So 2% is five times better than that.
So how do you "fine tune" your tyre pressures? Do you use the vehicle OEM plate on the door column? Or some other 'authority' value. Or some value that works best for your vehicle/load/speed/road condition or a 4psi or 6psi rise rule? Even the pressure you used today will not have the same significance as tomorrow with maybe a 5c difference in ambient temperature.
Has your tyre gauge had its calibration compared to a recognised standard?
There is little purpose to being anal about the numbers on either your tyre gauge or your TPMS.

Forget it. All your tyre gauge or your TPMS is worth in reading tyre pressure is to show if the pressure is significantly different today as it was yesterday.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Briste - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 17:38

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 17:38
Just to be clear, the Safety Dave units are those little transmitters that screw on in place of the valve caps, so pretty small.

I have three gauges I used to check tyre pressures. One is a digital gauge that came as part of my Bushranger Max Air III Compressor. I also have an ARB deflator with an analogue gauge, and a large analogue gauge I bought from somewhere like SCA or Repco a few years ago. Surprisingly when I set my tyres at 40psi and measured using all of them out of interest, all three agreed, but the TPMS had a different view on some wheels. Not by a lot, but perhaps 1-2psi. The TPMS lost the vote 3-1.

I did this test because not long after I got the TPMS, I set the tyres using one of the gauges and soon after the TPMS seemed to suggest that some tyres had drifted slightly, which they hadn't. But when winter comes and/or I haven't checked pressures for a while, and the TPMS tells me the tyres are down to 35, I know that it's time to top them up.

How do I set pressures? Partly by following the advice of people whose views I respect, and partly by the 4PSI rule. For that I use the TPMS. In doing so I am assuming that is a more reliable for changes in pressure than absolute levels.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 17:53

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 17:53
I have used a couple of 'cheapy' TPMSs that have been OK.
Son bought me a Safety Dave at a garage sale, so I installed it.
Seems to work fine and has been reliable, but it is a terrible product from an ergonomics perspective.
1. The sensors are locked to the valve stems with tiny grub screws which have damaged the valve threads. I find this seriously inferior to the use of a lock nut which I have had on other products.
2. The display is very large. Unnecessarily so.
3. The display goes from left to right. That is non-sensical. From a driver's perspective it should go from top to bottom (vehicle front at the top).
4. It only displays one tyre at a time. A quick glance only gets you one tyre and you will never know which it will be. To check all tyres requires multiple checks. This is the poorest feature of the devise.
I would never buy one, especially at a premium price.
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Briste - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:10

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:10
How long ago was this Peter? I have read about these grub screws, but my unit doesn't have them. I have little lock nuts behind the screw-on sensors that you tighten against each sensor with a special spanner. Fiddly but it works. It sounds like the design has changed. I bought mine only last Nov.

I would not have said that the display was too large, perhaps another change, or YMMV. Left to right doesn't bother me, it's one of those things you adapt to.

Yes, it's one tyre at a time, which I gather is common with this style of unit. Someone I know has a similar one which is the same. It would be nice to see all of them at a glance, but this doesn't really concern me, because when I'm driving I'm only really interested in the alarms. I don't consider them accurate enough to be bothered reading the unit while driving. Well, mostly not.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:20

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:20
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Briste,
Your experience with the gauges does not surprise me. It is what I would expect from consumer gauges, even though many could be much further incorrect. The difference between them and the TPMS of 1-2psi is within the expected industry deviation of 2%. But there is nothing to say that the TPMS was less accurate than the 3 gauges. Instrumentation accuracy does not work like that. The gauges could all be wrong though similar. The only way to be sure of accuracy is to compare to a working standard traceable to a NATA laboratory.

The thing that I am trying to establish is that it is pointless to use gauges to adhere to some nominal tyre pressure maintenance when there is no established tyre pressure standard. The operating pressure is selected on an 'as need' basis by the user anyway despite nominal offerings. And your last paragraph reflects that very notion. And furthermore, it is exactly what I, and I suspect, many others do, with satisfying results.
Which is why I am saying to not get hung-up on gauge or TPMS precision. It is their repeatability to display the comparative pressure of each tyre that is more important. And I doubt that even that needs to be any better than 5% relative.

At the end of the day, the TPMS unit's role is to detect and annunciate a significant change in condition which may be of concern to the driver. And most of them do that quite well.

Now, don't anyone get me going on the prospect of an external sensor TPMS to detect and indicate the tyre's temperature with any degree of accuracy.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:24

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:24
" How long ago was this Peter? "
Not sure how old it is. I acquired it about a year ago.
You can get used to anything, but it is just a poor design, ergonomically, from my perspective, and I would not buy one for that reason.
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:53

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:53
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Peter,
I agree, that Safety Dave unit has a lousy interface even if it does perform its alarm function adequately.
My first-purchased unit, Tyre Dog, had such grub-screws and I decline to use them for fear of thread damage. My present Mata C has locknuts but I have removed them as being not necessary.... the sensor seems entirely secure without them and anyway, they do not prevent a villain from unscrewing the sensor by hand.

And I agree that many have an oversized display and then often clutter the screen with useless graphics. The Mata C that I have now is 45x35mm overall with the screen about 40X30mm and the four tyre pressures are arranged in view in a format mimicking the vehicle wheel layout. It is what any sensible person would expect. It displays only the pressure with no temperatures on the screen. A little button on the side. Simple and clear.

In point of fact, as an alarm device, a TPMS could function adequately as a blind alarm that provides merely an audible annunciation that a tyre, any tyre, is below a preset pressure value. No display at all. Upon asn alarm you merely stop, get out, and inspect your tyres. The one in question would probably be obvious to the eye. Such a device would be simple to manufacture and therefor cheaper as it has no display and the electronics do not even need to identify which wheel is alarming.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Warren H - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 20:35

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 20:35
Precision, accuracy? That brings out the pedant in this retired analytical chemist. Graphic from the internet.
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Reply By: Member - Jim S1 - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:35

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 18:35
I use a Masten unit from digOptions. Display is small and clear, and it has been fine for 3 years …. Batteries still going.

Cheers
Jim
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 20:43

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 20:43
I have had SensaTyre internal tyre monitors for over 15 years. They are strapped to the centre of the wheel rim before mounting the tyre. They give very accurate tyre temps which is more important than the pressure. They will also alert you to failing wheel bearings and dragging brakes or hand brake. Keeping your tyre temps under 50 degrees will enhance their life and be safer. As your vehicle is loaded to near its GVM knowing and monitoring your tyre temps becomes more critical.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 22:03

Monday, Jun 20, 2022 at 22:03
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Hi Chris,
I originally used internal sensor monitoring but when the batteries failed (after about 8 years) I replaced them with an external system.
Internal monitors are the only way to determine the tyre temperature which, as you say, is the important factor in tyre destruction. When a tyre is run under-deflated the excessive flexing creates heat which has a very deleterious affect on the tyre strength causing failure.
Having determined the relationship between pressure and temperature on my vehicle I deemed that monitoring the pressure was sufficient and moved to external sensors.

I would take you to task though over the actual safe temperature. You referenced no more than "50 degrees" as being desirable but a tyre standing in the sun would reach that on a warm day. I found that my tyres when fully inflated would be typically at about 60 degrees and could be as high as 70 when partially deflated. I adjusted my speed accordingly.
I found it virtually impossible to obtain a 'safe' temperature limit from the manufacturers but there was indication that 80 degrees was their upper limit.
Of course, lower temperatures will enhance tyre health.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2022 at 21:48

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2022 at 21:48
Hi Allan, you have misread my post. I said "Keeping your tyre temps under 50 degrees will enhance their life and be safer." you said I said "no more than "50 degrees". Which simply means that other than the mis quote I completely agree with second paragraph.
What I could add is that when my tyres do get to 50 degrees, I may do nothing, I may add air, I my drive slower, I might make more frequent stops. If ambient temp is 40+ the tar could be double that, it is going to be impossible to get to 50 degrees. I agree with you that 80 is probably the upper limit and at that temp I would definitely stop.
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Reply By: Member - David H72 - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 03:13

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 03:13
I have had the Safety Dave TPMS for several years now.

It has saved me a tyre on two occasions when I had a slow leak and noticed the tyre pressure slowly falling.
On a third occasion it gave me a high temperature alarm and we stopped immediately to investigate. A bearing, or the brake assembly, in my camper trailer had completely collapsed and cooked itself. There were very few rollers left in the bearings, the shoes had no lining left on them and the brake magnet had melted. This incident had occurred after about 40 minutes of driving after a long break at Borroloola and we were heading towards Lorella Springs.
There was no damage to the tyre.

I have a couple of thoughts about the unit and senders;

I never use the grub screws and have not yet lost a sensor off a valve stem nor have I had one damaged. We have unfortunately left one at a service station and when we remembered, on return we found it had been run over, We left one other on the side of the road when dropping tyre pressures for a gravel road. Each of us had thought the other had replaced them on both occasions. Replacements were express posted to us the same day we contacted them. Safety Dave’s warranty and after sales service is excellent.

The display screen is large enough to read from the other side of the dash board - we mount it there so my wife can easily monitor it and I am not distracted by it. I find it VERY suitable. If there is an issue then it instantly displays which tyre is affected with the pressure and temperature display.

The unit is adjustable over a very large range of pressure and temperature and you can set the limits that suit you and you can buy as many tyre sensors as you have wheels (up to 18 I think).

The lithium button batteries are very easy to replace and I just carefully nip up the caps with multigrip pliers.

Regarding pressure accuracy I set my pressures pretty carefully with both my deflator and another analogue gauge that I have. Often the display shows a 1 or 2psi difference between tyres and my thoughts are that, if your target pressure is say 40psi, and one tyre shows 39 and another 41 then how can one know whether it is say 39.0 or 39.9 and 41.1 or 41.9. To me an indicated 2psi difference is neither here nor there. You can get more than that variation if the sun is on one side of the car.

I think they are a very simple and capable TPMS.


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Follow Up By: Briste - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:18

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:18
Dave - did your unit come with the optional two-piece protective covers? You have to put the back half on before the sensor unit and then you screw the front half on after the sensor is fitted. I initially used these covers, thinking that they must have been included for a reason. But they can be difficult to remove when you're trying to air down and up - the plastic threads get dusty and stick - and I quickly decided to leave them off. It's not clear why Safety Dave think they're necessary. Does anyone know?

My earlier comment about accuracy, which attracted so much comment, was probably poorly phrased. I guess my point was not to be surprised if it there are slight discrepancies with the gauge you used to set the pressures, but larger differences, say 5psi, will indicate some drift.
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Follow Up By: Member - David H72 - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 12:06

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 12:06
No, didn’t get the covers and never seen them. Maybe they help stop the sensors hitting the rim and marking it. I’ve never had any damage anyway. Reckon they’d be a pita.

Cheers
David
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Follow Up By: Member - Gordon B5 - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 19:56

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 19:56
Briste, same as you. 2 piece protective covers & lock nuts didn't last the 1st trip , they are still in the car some where but I don't miss them, no damage without them & they are on the car all the time & we live on unsealed roads and have no problem.
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Follow Up By: Briste - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2022 at 09:12

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2022 at 09:12
The protective covers are indeed a right pain. The may be an option for a vehicle that doesn't air down, but not otherwise.

I confess that I have persisted with the lock nuts. They seem a better far option than that the grub screws would have been. I guess they provide some piece of mind. With a bit of practice it's possible to tighten then just enough that they're not hard to quickly undo with the little spanner, but tight enough that someone walking past couldn't just opportunistically unscrew one. It's become just part of the routine on six wheels, and hasn't yet got to the point of ditching them, but it may.
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Follow Up By: Member - Robert1660 - Sunday, Jun 26, 2022 at 18:49

Sunday, Jun 26, 2022 at 18:49
A very interesting topic! I had a SensaTyre system on my previous 200 Series. Tried to get the same for the new Cruiser but supply issues prevented that so I went with a Safety Dave system for vehicle plus caravan. Have just completed a 10000km trip to the Gulf. System worked very well. I did not use the locking nuts and managed not to lose any of the sensors. Certainly without the locking nuts airing up and down is essentially the same as without the sensor caps. Certainly temperature readings are not overly accurate but pressure values were very good. I thought I might need the signal booster for the pickup from the caravan but this proved not to be the case. Probably my bigest gripe is the display. It is very difficult to read in certain lighting conditions and for safety reasons I had my wife do a sequence reading for me every so often. Overall not as good as the internal system but from a convenience perspective it is a winner.
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 07:45

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 07:45
I have Tyre Dogs . The alarm allowed me enough time to find a wide shoulder on a motorway to pull over, tyre saved. If long valve stems are a concern with the sensor hanging out or centrifugal force bending long stems then use 20mm motorcycle stems.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 08:57

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 08:57
I use closed cell foam donuts on the valve stems to stop the TyreDogs banging themselves to destruction on the rims.
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 09:33

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 09:33

Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 09:41

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 09:41
.
I did the same in the Troopy Peter. A second short metal stem dedicated to the TPMS sensor.
Located well into the rim for safety and no fear of losing one during airing down.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - John - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:00

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:00
Peter, I fitted metal "T" stems, easier than drilling new holes. (T valve stems from Hawkshead $9.95 USD each)
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:37

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:37
I use the T-stems with Safety Dave TPMS and have for 5 or six years over the usual CSR, CS, AB etc etc. Never had a problem with either. Have only needed to change batteries once. Have 8 sensors so vehicle, camper and spares all covered.

Regards
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Reply By: Member - Siringo - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 10:59

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 10:59
Great info and advice everyone, thanks you.

I hadn't considered tyre temps, I was only thinking of staked tyres.

I'm looking into a TPMS mostly for when I do remote trips. When I do remote trips, my tyres are deflated which is when they will get hotter than normal.

I've been just thinking of monitoring pressure, but temperature is just as vital.

Do most TPMS's have temperature monitors?
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:12

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 11:12
Temperature monitoring with external sensors is uselessly inaccurate.
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Siringo - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 14:35

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 14:35
Yep, I can understand that Peter_n_Margaret. Thanks for pointing it out.

What about internal sensors that fit within the wheel, but are part of or connected to the valve stem?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 15:42

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 15:42
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The stem mounted internal sensors have a fair chance of correctly reading tyre temperature. They are actually responding to the air temperature within the tyre space which would be close to the tyre temperature if perhaps a little lower as the rim would be dissipating some heat. The internal sensors strapped to the inner of the rim would be similar but probably a little lower in reading. They may however respond somewhat to wheel bearing or brake overheat.
External sensors have no hope of reading tyre temperature. They are located in free-flowing outside air and will read closer to ambient.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Siringo - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 16:54

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 16:54
Yes, that'd be my understanding too Allan.

That brand you have, they have a model with internal sensors. Think I'll look into them.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 17:24

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 17:24
The problem with valve mounted internal sensors is that they are likely to be destroyed every time you have a flat.
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 17:36

Tuesday, Jun 21, 2022 at 17:36
.
That has not occured with mine Peter. Mind you, I haven't had a lot of flats.
Mine actually sat well below the bead line so it would take a very flat tyre folding into the rim to contact them.
Anyway, isn't the operation of the TMPS intended to warn when tyre pressure falls about 25% below norm permitting a diligent driver to attend before the tyre reaches severely flat?
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - David H72 - Wednesday, Jun 22, 2022 at 15:37

Wednesday, Jun 22, 2022 at 15:37
The temperature indicated in the valve stem sensors may not be accurate however all one really needs is an indication. We are not doing a scientific experiment, we’re just wanting to save the inconvenience and expense of a new tyre.
As I said, my Safety Dave TPMS has saved me ruining a tyre 3 times. Money well spent in my opinion.

I also have a motorcycle with internal TPMS. in typical BMW fashion one the batteries go flat it’s off with the wheel, remove a tyre and replace the entire unit. Someone has worked out how to replace the batteries but there is a high risk of damaging the unit in the process.

I think the valve stem TPMS units are perfectly adequate.

Apparently Tyre Dog is very similar to Safety Dave but they offer zero after sales service from what I’ve heard on other forums.
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Reply By: Bazooka - Monday, Jun 27, 2022 at 14:11

Monday, Jun 27, 2022 at 14:11
If anyone is currently looking for a TPMS and interested in the Promata products, just noticed that Promata Au (Carmate Electronics pty Ltd ) is having an EOFY sale 20% off sale. Ends 30 June. Code is PROMATA20

Promata EOFY sale
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