Lake Eyre

By golly, won't Lake Eyre be good when this latest lot of rain gets there in a couple of months!
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Reply By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 09:47

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 09:47
There is an old saying………..don’t count your chickens before the eggs hatch.

Don’t get your hopes up yet, way to early and I have not heard on what that Channel Country received, and it takes prolonged rain over a long period, not just days to effect what happens downstream.
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Follow Up By: Genny - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 09:59

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 09:59
Flooding in the Thompson, Barcoo, Diamantina, Western, Georgina, Eyre Creek and Cooper Creek. I think that is every watercourse in Queensland that feeds that way.
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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 12:56

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 12:56
Agree, but..........it takes months of rain, not just a weeks flooding and this is usually from the summer monsoon rains when it is usually at its heaviest, for weeks after weeks.

Apart from local rainfall over Lake Eyre itself, there are only 2 main watercourses to enter Lake Eyre.

The Diamantina and then via the top at the Warburton Groove.

The second entry point is the lower rhs of Lake Eyre North via the Cooper.

Every watercourse in central outback then needs to converge on the Cooper and Diamantina.

Then the waiting games starts, as there are hundreds of small depressions that need to fill and then slowly continue their course to the lowest point on the Australian Mainland.

Don't get me wrong, I would love to see Lake Eyre fill properly, not like media reports to get people to the outback and spend big dollars on plane flights, and would love to see the Cooper over the Birdsville Track again.

Thats all I can say, but it is now down to mother nature to see if it happens again.
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Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 13:46

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 13:46
Stephen is right and even when water does ever reach Lake Eyre you cannot really see it from the shores. Still requires a flight to be much different to any other visit at any other time.

Here is the link to Wright's Air website with their Current Conditions Report - worth a look
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 15:38

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 15:38
This is 1974 when it was "full".
We were in an F28 Fokker. The water came all the way to the "edges" and even spilled over past them in places. We then drove a Kombi back from Alice to Adelaide in the wet.


Cheers,
Peter
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Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 17:47

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 17:47
The Lake Eyre Yacht Club does not expect much to reach the lake. They are as in tune with the situation as anyone.

"LATEST NEWS (click Refresh):
"Heavy rain in Queensland catchment (100-200mm) and local rain (45mm) over Lake. Queensland rivers brief flood will probably not contribute much water if any. Cooper won't reach Birdsville Track."

In the last big fill, the Neal's and Macumba rivers contributed to the filling. They are currently contributing very little.

If the Warburton is flowing well, and the lake has water in the northern section, the best way to see the lake is a flight from Birdsville. It's a longer flight but you see more. We flew via the Eyre Creek and the Warburton rivers, down the Warburton Groove, across the lake and home via the the Goyder Lagoons and the Diamantina River. It was an interesting trip of over 4 hours.


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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 17:53

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 17:53
I’ve not followed the BOM site flood readings too closely for that recent flood event, but even with a major flood in the Cooper, the sum of all streams are unlikely to have a vast impact on Lake Eyre. Rain this week in Winton area will keep the Thomson & Diamantina flowing for longer, but cause little difference to end result.

I’ve lived in Lake Eyre Basin for many years, and spent 22 years of them on the Diamantina, often pondering how that much water streaming past the station, couldn’t fill the Lake? It usually took big, general rain events & major floods to do the job.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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