Aircon for tent

Submitted: Tuesday, Sep 28, 2021 at 15:57
ThreadID: 142649 Views:1958 Replies:14 FollowUps:13
Anyone used aircon in tent. my tent is 2.5 by 2.5 meters and 170cm high , what would a good portable refidgerated aircon to buy that would be effective in cooling the tent. l was thinking of using it at a powered camping site at a caravan park , but also what would be a good one to buy that would be good if l wanted to run it off a generator, one that will cool the tent but not use too much power
Back Reply Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Gronk - Tuesday, Sep 28, 2021 at 21:35

Tuesday, Sep 28, 2021 at 21:35
Be a lot cheaper to buy some cement pills !! Lol
AnswerID: 638123

Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 07:52

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 07:52
Motel room??
AnswerID: 638124

Reply By: Chris J16 - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 08:21

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 08:21
What about one of these, tow to site and self contained!!
AnswerID: 638126

Follow Up By: RMD - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 10:21

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 10:21
KOOL ! Just what the doctor ordered.
1
FollowupID: 916414

Reply By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 08:25

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 08:25
If AC is a required comfort level for your needs perhaps a tent isn’t the appropriate camping accommodation for you.
Maybe you should consider a van or some on-site accommodation in those circumstances.

For me air conditioning a tent is running against the grain of that style of camping
AnswerID: 638127

Follow Up By: RMD - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 10:23

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 10:23
Alby.
To aircondition a tent don't you just open the door flap? Some even have flow through too.
3
FollowupID: 916415

Reply By: Member - Warren H - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 10:06

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 10:06
If you are camping inland with low humidity perhaps an evaporative cooler, low power consumption, works well with cross flow ventilation.
NT Pajero
2007 Goldstream Crown

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 638131

Reply By: Member - Lloyd M - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 11:40

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 11:40
I once saw someone try this with a portable unit in very hot weather, they had a powered site, it did work in the camper trailer but to get the best efficiency he had to damp down the canvas as well with a hose.

Next year at the same event he up-graded to a small motorhome.

Hope this helps,
Lloyd

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 638132

Reply By: Hoyks - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 13:16

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 13:16
Tents are the worst structure to try and cool, they have next to no insulation and plenty of ventilation. I have slept in an air conditioned tent, but the air con is pretty much running flat out the whole time and if the power goes out, then the temperature equalizes with the outside world rather rapidly.

Portable, self contained air conditioners are generally a bit rubbish. To cool the system they need to exhaust a lot of heat to the outside via a duct/hose. But to do this they need to also blow a lot of the air from inside the room out through that duct, which has to be replaced with un-cooled air from outside.

If you want to be able to run it off a generator, then you're probably restricted to something around the 2hp range, the most efficient and cheapest would probably be a window rattler on a milk crate. That way you keep the heat and machinery out of the tent, ducting the cool air in may need a bit of work, but nothing that can't be overcome with a roll of tape and an apple box.

Whatever you choose will be heavy and bulky though.
AnswerID: 638135

Reply By: Kazza055 - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 17:00

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 17:00
November last year we stayed at Margaret River and the camper next door had a small split system with a ceiling duct unit. He had a short length of duct running into the camper. The external unit was mounted on the camper along with the duct unit, just a simple matter of fitting the duct when needed.
AnswerID: 638136

Follow Up By: Gronk - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 19:22

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 19:22
And what was the noise like ?
0
FollowupID: 916429

Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 19:53

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 19:53
Didn't notice so must have been quiet unlike a lot of the rooftop caravan units.

I assume it was an inverter type.
0
FollowupID: 916430

Follow Up By: wholehog - Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 21:41

Wednesday, Sep 29, 2021 at 21:41
The no idea campers are frequent. Air cond in a tent... ffs.
1
FollowupID: 916432

Reply By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 06:43

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 06:43
A fan is good enough, if you need an air conditioner then get a cabin. The idea of lugging around an air conditioner for tenting sort of does my head in.
AnswerID: 638138

Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 08:16

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 08:16
Whilst living and working in Saudi Arabia for almost three years, I can tell you that air conditioning a tent is possible, and can be effective. The only problem is that you need multiple units, the air conn units have to be very large, and are usually mounted on trailers or skids, and come with their own generators. Of course, these were for fairly large tents, much larger than used for family camping.

It is just not practical to try an air condition a tent. If you are trying to maintain a temperature of around 22 degrees, the air conn unit would be constantly cycling, particularly in high humidity. You would obviously need a 240 volt power supply. The unit would also need to be of a sufficiently high enough volume to maintain a constant supply of cool air through an unsealed tent, it would also need to be located outside the tent and ducted into the tent or the hot air coming from the “condenser exhaust” would overwhelm the cooling capacity.

Like I said, just not practical.

Macca.
Macca.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 638140

Reply By: Batt's - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 08:21

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 08:21
Opus camper trailer they have the option of adding A/C.
AnswerID: 638141

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 09:37

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 09:37
https://www.seeleyinternational.com/eu/project/mina-tent-city-saudi-arabia/
Seeley International manufactured 50,000 evaporative air conditioners in Adelaide to cool a tent city in Saudi Arabia.
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
AnswerID: 638144

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 11:24

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 11:24
.
That is a fascinating link you provided Peter. A contract for 50,000 Breezair evaporative air conditioners manufactured in Australia. Our industries are perhaps not quite dead yet! I take my hat off to Seely.

I was introduced to the Breezair conditioner way back in 1954. They were the standard house coolers in Woomera and were a pretty basic unit, but certainly provided effective cooling in the low humidity. From reading Seely's report the Breezair has developed much since 1954 and is a very acceptable system where the air is dry and water is available. But they are not very effective north of Brisbane.

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 916438

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 13:00

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 13:00
I worked for Seeley for 25 years, mostly in product development. I went to some "interesting" places too. Like Libya, and I was in Bagdad 2 weeks before Gulf war #1.
Interesting that you say that they are not effective north of Brisbane. They are actually used in some large Darwin shopping areas during the dry season then they swap to refrig. as it gets humid. That is simply to take advantage of the power savings.
Some of their later products are quite sophisticated. Variable frequency inverter motors for instance. All designed and manufactured right here in Adelaide for 20+ years.
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
2
FollowupID: 916441

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 13:47

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 13:47
.
No Pete. I actually said "not VERY effective" alluding to the periods of high humidity. Even so, I have seen a few in the tropical zones and wondered how much use they got.

In your time with Seely maybe you saw in their 'museum' the old window-mounted Breezair as we had at Woomera. It was no more than a vented sheetmetal box containing a radial (read exhaust) fan surrounded by a drum covered with a fibrous matter which rotated through a water-filled pan. I thought it to be neat simplicity.
On my return from Woomera I constructed my own but with a small pump that distributed the water to vertical pads on 3 sides as per the Coolgardie safes. I considered it worked better than the original, but then, I was viewing with a proprietary eye.

On the Woomera range we used Kelvinator 'Coldmakers' which were refrigerant aircons in a transportable form about 1.5 metre cubed with a pair of insulated flexible hoses to circulate chilled air through the instrument or radar vans. They were very effective. Evaporative type may not have been appropriate for fear of introducing water condensation into the electronics.

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 916442

Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 14:07

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 14:07
Totally agree with Allan, evaporative systems do not work well in hot humid conditions. The evaporative air conn units used in Saudi Arabia were only used in the internal parts of the country, and not near the coast where the majority of the population is. Near the coast in summer humidity is 99.9% most of the time. When going outside from an air conditioned building, it is like walking into a brick wall.

Macca.
Macca.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 916443

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 15:30

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 15:30
Allan, that early unit you describe was not a Seeley product. I can't remember where they got the Breezair name, but it goes back a way. I recall one exactly like that at the Horwood Bagshaw factory at Mile End in Adelaide in the early '60s. The fibrous stuff on the drum was horse hair.
Seeley International (originally Seeley Bros.) was started in 1972 (50 years next year) by Frank Seeley (currently Chairman of the Board) and his wife Kathy. It is still owned by the family.
The "technology" of evaporative cooling was originally commercialised in the USA, but a continuous effort to make them cheaper effectively destroyed the product and the market. Seeley sell some there now at a large price (and performance) premium. Many thousands are manufactured in the Middle East and India. My trip to Iraq in 1991 was to help negotiate a manufacture under licence arrangement with a factory there. They already made many times the volume that Seeley made, but wanted a good quality product and had chosen a Seeley product after an extensive testing comparison. And they had an excellent test lab. Pity about the war.
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
0
FollowupID: 916445

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 18:43

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 18:43
Peter,
I thought that the "Woomera" units were called BreezeAir. Mind you, I never saw it written, only phonetically. And that was "back a way"!
I knew that the drum was covered with horsehair but chose not to say so because I thought that I would be ridiculed.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 916458

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 19:50

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 19:50
"When did Seeley International take over breezair cooling?
In 1984, General Electric exited the rooftop cooling business, letting Seeley International take over the Breezair brand name. The Breezair Evaporative cooler is found all around the world cooling everything ranging from houses to houseboats, greenhouses to factories."

Well there you go :)
So those horse hair coolers might have been GE?
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
1
FollowupID: 916460

Reply By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 21:29

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 21:29
Has john j10 replied ?
AnswerID: 638155

Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 21:57

Thursday, Sep 30, 2021 at 21:57
After all the negative comments and not answering the question - why would he.
3
FollowupID: 916464

Reply By: Bazooka - Friday, Oct 01, 2021 at 20:50

Friday, Oct 01, 2021 at 20:50
Hi John. This guy's diy job could work if you have a portable fridge to make ice or cold water.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0Itzs9bqR4

Early version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITtlxjvLQis

A fly over a tent makes a big difference, as does tent positioning obviously.
AnswerID: 638158

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)