Pick This Place

Submitted: Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 21:21
ThreadID: 140490 Views:1305 Replies:4 FollowUps:17
This one should be dead easy and go off immediately.

Do you know where this is?
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 21:38

Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 21:38
It looks like a runway on a salt lake. Or perhaps course markers for land yachts.

But where? Lake Eyre or Lake Gairdner, perhaps?
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 21:48

Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 21:48
You are on the money Frank, but where?
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 22:00

Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 22:00
Well, I had two bites at the cherry above, so I'll reiterate them.

Lake Eyre or Lake Gairdner?
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Follow Up By: equinox - Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 22:34

Wednesday, Sep 09, 2020 at 22:34
Probably where they do the speed trials at LG
Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 07:23

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 07:23
Frank and Al

Firstly Frank, as I said above you were so very close, but only 1 correct answer is accepted .

Al is spot on, it is Lake Gairdner and those are the start of the 8 miles of markers that are used during the annual Speed Week.

The Lake is over 160 kilometres long and 48 kilometres wide And the depth of solid salt is over 1.2 metres deep. When full of water in a flood, it is Australia’s third largest salt water lake.

Well done Al for getting it straight off.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 15:00

Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 15:00
.
Stephen, I could have sworn that was Sir Malcolm Campbell standing in the first pic with his hands on his hips. And isn't that Warren Bonython next to him? Which would have made it on Lake Eyre in.... er, what year was it again?
On the other hand young fellow, you would probably not have been there with your camera.
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Reply By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 12:03

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 12:03
While we're on the topics of salt lakes, lets see if someone can guesstimate this one.

It's neither Lakes Gairdner or Eyre but it is significant in size and holds a unique place in Australian exploration history.

Equinox, give everyone else a go first lol.

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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: pmk03 - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 13:51

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 13:51
Would it be Lake Frome ?

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 15:36

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 15:36
No Paul, further north.
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: DBN05 (lyrup sa) - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 13:34

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 13:34
Maybe Lake Disappointment on CSR ??
I NEVER get lost, but don't i see a lot of NEW places.

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 15:44

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 15:44
Nice guess but no. A fair drive east of there. They all look a bit the same after a while don't they lol.



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Follow Up By: GarryR - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 17:03

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 17:03
Lake Gregory west of lake Blanche
location - Warragul -Victoria
life is too short, so out and about enjoy

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 18:03

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 18:03
No Garry, not Lake Gregory.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 19:26

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 19:26
A clue or two; -

I am 180 km long and 10 wide making me the largest lake in the state or territory in which I'm found.

I struck fear into the hearts of many explorers who tried to find a way across or around me and there were many.

The final extent of my reach was not fully appreciated until the McKay areal survey of 1930 (I'm not Lake McKay either :-)
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Follow Up By: Member - Andy M (QLD) - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 19:45

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 19:45
I'll have a go at this one Mick.... How about Lake Amadeus?
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 20:26

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 20:26
You are on the money Andy.

The only problem, it is well off road and would be seldom seen by the average four wheel driver.

The dead giveaway is the quad bike....you can not use them on public roads.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 20:43

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 20:43
Spot on Andy.

Seldom seen and seldom visited it is the largest salt lake in the Northern Territory. There is a restricted access track that splits the western extremities and it can be seen from some of the heights along the Merenie but it's still as mysterious now as it was back then. The country is absolutely amazing and one I'd like to spend a bit more time exploring one day.

I'll drop a history in a follow-up.

Cheers

Mick
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 20:45

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020 at 20:45
Lake Amadeus – A history

Lake Amadeus is a large salt-lake in the south-west corner of Australia's Northern Territory, about 50 km north of Uluru (Ayers Rock). Amadeus is 180 kilometres (110 miles) long and ten kilometres (6.2 miles) wide, making it the largest salt-lake in the Northern Territory.

The first European to discover the lake, the explorer Ernest Giles, encountered it in 1872. Giles originally intended to honour his benefactor Baron Ferdinand von Mueller by naming it Lake Ferdinand. However, Mueller prevailed upon Giles to instead honour King Amadeo I of Spain (reigned 1870-1873, known in English as King Amadeus I), who had previously bestowed honour on him. The lake's expanse proved a barrier for Giles, who could see both the as-yet undiscovered Ayers Rock (Uluru) and The Olgas (Kata Tjuta), but could not reach them, as the dry lake bed wasn't able to support the weight of his horses. The next year William Gosse climbed and named both rises.

In late October 1872 Giles made several attempts at crossing the lake to reach Mount Olga; all failed, and some were near disastrous. One foray nearly cost Giles his expedition when his horses broke through the salt crust and were immediately…
“…floundering about in the bottomless bed of this infernal lake. We were powerless to help them, for we could not get near owing to the bog, and we sank up over our knees, where the crust was broken, in hot salt mud. All I could do was to crack my whip to prevent the horses from ceasing to exert themselves, and although it was but a few moments that they were in this danger, to me it seemed an eternity. They staggered at last out of the quagmire, heads, backs, saddles, everything covered with blue mud, their mouths were filled with salt mud also, and they were completely exhausted when they reached firm ground".
Ernest Giles – Australia Twice Traversed

The impenetrable barrier of Lake Amadeus and the harshness of the surrounding country defeated Giles on his first attempt at crossing to the west coast of the continent.
The following year William Christie Gosse had similar difficulties, crossing Giles’ tracks several times searching for a way south, but whereas Giles followed the lake to the north-west Gosse travelled south-east. Gosse crossed the lake at a narrow neck, at "latitude 24° 50', longitude 131° 30'," and continued south and west to happen upon the most remarkable natural feature he had ever seen…
"…being one solid rock (fine conglomerate) two miles long, one mile wide, and 1100 feet high, a spring coming from its centre. I named it Ayers Rock." (after the then Chief Secretary of South Australia, Sir Henry Ayers).

In August 1886, Henry Tietkens, Giles’ second-in-command on his 1873 and 1875 expeditions, reminded members of the South Australian branch of the Royal Geographical Society that very little was known about Lake Amadeus. "On our present maps we see a leg of mutton shaped figure, bounded by dotted lines, but the real extent of this interesting feature is unknown to us". No doubt with an eye to future employment Tietkens suggested that the Society, the Government and the citizens of South Australia had a duty to rectify this oversight. On the 22nd of July 1889, as leader of The Central Australian Exploring and Prospecting Association Expedition, he reported from Erldunda that his expedition was safe and well but had found no gold or grazing lands, and that "Mount Unapproachable in Long's Range marks the western extremity of Lake Amadeus".

The Horn Expedition crossed the eastern end of the lake in June 1894, and noted that the surface of the lake was found to be tolerably firm, the horses only sinking to the depth of a few inches". In October 1902, W. R. Murray, the surveyor on R. T. Maurice's expedition to the north coast, reported on the journey and had little to say about Lake Amadeus. "We crossed Lake Amadeus at its western end, after having made several unsuccessful attempts to get over it at its broader parts".

By 1930 the bounds and nature of Lake Amadeus were well enough known. The north-western extremity lay in the vicinity of Long's Range, and to the south-east it was negotiable at longitude 131° 30', and from hard experience uncrossable at its wider parts. No watercourses entered the lake and it did not flood; no valuable minerals had been discovered in the area, and the grazing lands were ephemeral, if not risky. The lake bed was a salt mud bog, variously described as sterile, barren and dangerous. In June 1930 Lake Amadeus was in the news when the Mackay Ariel Survey Expedition put the finishing touches to the map, finding the lake somewhat smaller than expected, with nothing favourable to add to a forbidding record.
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: equinox - Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 20:44

Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 20:44
Hi all,
I visited Mount Unapproachable when in the area in 2012.

With a name like that I couldn't resist giving it a crack at some stage.

Here is a link to blog:

Not Beyond Approach - A Quest for Mount Unapproachable
Cheers
Alan
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In whatever comes our way.

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Reply By: RMD - Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 12:15

Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 12:15
Stephen
Seeing you are a much travelled fellow and you said, "this one would go off immediately" I thought it was something you had discovered and would surely be a picture of a rocket at Woomera or at least a small nuclear bomb.

PS. The problems in Vic are being solved as a percentage of the population now have severe Stockholm Syndrome and have fallen in love with their captor and obeying to the extreme.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 21:42

Friday, Sep 11, 2020 at 21:42
" a percentage of the population now have severe Stockholm Syndrome and have fallen in love with their captor and obeying to the extreme."

There you go, RMD, you'll be out of lockdown in no time :-)

One can only hope, eh?

Stay safe down there.
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