Cutting fire wood

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 12:56
ThreadID: 136551 Views:2923 Replies:17 FollowUps:39
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Our forefathers used an axe , then Petrol chainsaws , with cordless technology we now have eg. dewalt 54v chainsaws and reciprocating saws ,I’d be interested in hearing back from anyone who have used these as an alternative.
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Reply By: Notso - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 13:45

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 13:45
Brother in Law uses a Makita Battery powered chainsaw. Works OK on smaller ltimber.

Only has about a 12 inch chain I think.

Here is a comparison of a few of them.

Battery Chainsaw test.
AnswerID: 618300

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 13:45

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 13:45
We rarely light a fire except very occasionally when travelling with others.
When we do, we would only burn wood that could be easily broken by hand, if necessary. Anything that needs more than that is too big to burn and should be left undisturbed for the critters.

For emergency use we carry a reciprocating saw. It does not matter how long it takes to clear a fallen tree from a track and a reciprocating saw is much more versatile in what it can cut compared with a chain saw that can only cut wood.

Cheers,
Peter
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AnswerID: 618301

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 16:45

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 16:45
Always thought our wildlife had enough to deal with, ( Cats,Fox's etc), without some other large animal coming along and dumping their house on a fire.
Dave.
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Reply By: Sawtybt - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 14:27

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 14:27
We used to carry a chainsaw along with the oil and petrol but have now changed to a Ryobi one+ 18 volt reciprocating saw.

It has a nine each blade and is ideal for cutting firewood.
AnswerID: 618303

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 16:19

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 16:19
There are 2 models, I had the more powerful one. R18RS. It lasted about 40 cuts then died. Ryobi said it's not for cutting trees and firewood. I pointed out that the specs in the manual said 200MM max thickness. They said that is pine and intermittent use only.

I thought it was going to be a good alternative. It's not up to the job.

The one shown is the RRS1801 that's worse.
Tony
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 19:20

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 19:20
thats interesting, I've had my ryobi demo saw for 5 years and flog it, never missed a beat of course, you must have got a bad one, or two! or something.
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Follow Up By: FatGaz - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 12:07

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 12:07
I have the exact model pictured and would NOT use it as a chainsaw replacement. Takes a long time to get through most wood. I thought it would be a good option so I got one and even got a longer blade for getting through larger logs. It takes far too long to get thru forearm sized pieces of gum (Stuff you would collect and want to cut down for fires).

As mentioned by Boobook... It's not up to the job.
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Follow Up By: Nutta - Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018 at 07:35

Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018 at 07:35
As with any bladed power tool the quality of the blade plays a huge part, the ones shipped with the tool are generally average at best, I buy the good quality demolition blades, they work great.
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Follow Up By: Iza B - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018 at 11:14

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018 at 11:14
I use my Ryobi reciprocating saw in preference to the Ryobi chain saw. Flog it on up to 120 mm dry gum. The chain saw works well on green timber. Warranty on Ryobi 18 range is now 6 years.

The latest model Stihl battery chain saw has a much thinner chain and I will look carefully at that one if I ever break the ones I have now.

Iza
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 15:01

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 15:01
Hi Lyncol


When we started off on our Bush Trips many moons ago, we used to use an old bushman's hand saw and it took a long time to cut hard wood like Mulga and Gidgee.

We then took one of our smaller 12" Chainsaws, but the Gidgee and Mulga would soon blunt a chain very quick, and we had to carry a supple on chains as well as oil and petrol.

We now carry in the camper at all times a Bosch 18v Professional Reciprocating Saw.

This is by far the best thing we have ever used, cuts through Mulga and Gidgee in no time flat, cuts through old railway sleepers with ease, and best of all, no fuel , oil and chains to carry.

I do carry a supply of blades in both 8" and 12" lengths and they last for ever, will not go blunt if it hits stone, sand and the like.


Cheers



Stephen

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Reply By: KevinE - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 15:02

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 15:02
Hi Lyncol, the concept of battery powered saws is fantastic, but the reality of them isn't!

The little Makita 36v puts out a whopping .8kw (tongue firmly in cheek!). To put that into perspective, amongst other chainsaws, I have a tiny Makita 22cc pruning saw (231T) that puts out .74kw stock. My little saw is modified to run a lot harder than a stock saw & would still be completely useless for cutting firewood. A tiny .006kw extra from the 36v cordless isn't going to change that too much!

I looked, but couldn't find the kw figures for the DeWalt 54v. I'd like to see them if someone can find them.

A Silky brand hand saw is always an option if you don't like 2 stroke saws I guess?








AnswerID: 618305

Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 16:42

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 16:42
Hi Lyncol,

Before deciding what it the best equip to buy. You need to decide what you intend doing.

If all you need is a few logs for a camp fire then cordless items are okay. If you're cutting a trailer of firewood for home, there's only one way to go a petrol chainsaw.


We threw a tent fly over bushes getting underneath. The camels squatted and poked their heads underneath. The temperature 124ºF. Rudall 30 12 1896

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AnswerID: 618307

Reply By: Gronk - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 17:55

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 17:55
90% of my camping is weekends, and when I need more wood for the fire ( not camping without one !! ) it's just as easy to whip out a petrol chainsaw as anything else. Carry it in a canvas bag that also houses the petrol ( only carry 1 ltr ) and bar oil. When finished, it goes back in the bag, no charging required, and ready for the next time.
With a cordless thing, my luck it would be flat when I needed to use it..
AnswerID: 618311

Reply By: Member - Bigfish - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 18:31

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 18:31
Husquvana with a 22 inch bar. Absolute ripper. I have a reciprocating saw..Milwaukee..does a great job but it wont cut 3-400mm firewood.
AnswerID: 618314

Follow Up By: KevinE - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 19:27

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 19:27
Which Husqvarna do you put your 22" bar on Big Fish?
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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 19:50

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 19:50
Its an old hardwood 55. Sorry its a 20inch bar. Years ago I had 5 Huskies. One had a 52 inch bar. I used to cut firewood. The one I have now is at least 20 years old, has cut many tonnes of wood and still performs extremely well.
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Follow Up By: KevinE - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 23:18

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 23:18
I have 11 chainsaws ATM, but that 50-60cc range leaves me cold I'm afraid.

I have 2 x polesaws, just in case one breaks (everyone who uses chainsaws to put food on the table needs a working polesaw)

5 x Top Handles - what can I say, I like top handled saws!

1 x 70cc saw (good saw)

1 x 78cc saw (excellent saw!)

1 x 92cc saw (very good saw)

1 x 93cc saw (good saw)

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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 06:42

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 06:42
I used to love going out into the paddocks and cutting wood. A lot of redgum, yellowbox and some other gum. I had (in conjunction with a mate) 2 x 120cc, 2 x 90cc, 2 x 65cc. Not one of them ever let me down . Went through a lot of chains and on the long barred saw we just swapped a chain over in the field rather than hand sharpen. Hand sharpened all the chains....still reckon you get a better cut than with a bench set up. Some go with stihl some with the huskies. I,ll pick a huskie anytime. Its tough work at times ...we used a hand splitter and cut about 6 tonne a day between us. Couldnt do it now though...lol. Only downside is I,ve got arthritis a bit in the knuckles (white-knuckle) and the cooler nights in Cairns make them ache a bit. I,ve been using a product called ZEN for when they get sore. Thankfully living here in the warmth helps tremendously. Could never go back South!
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 14:27

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 14:27
Hi Bigfish

If you are cutting 300-400mm timber for a campfires, you must have some ripper fires.


I only cut that size timber at home and then hand split it into halves and quarters for our home slow combustion heater.

For our campfire needs, I only cut timber no more than around 20cm, as that size will still take a long time to burn.



Cheers




Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 15:18

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 15:18
Carry a splitter as well and as you say trim it down to 100-200mm diameter. Normally a few sitting around the fire so yes...we need good wood and sometimes quite a bit if it gets cold. Normally heaps of wood where I go...if not then no fire...no problems. Common sense used .
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Follow Up By: KevinE - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 19:47

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 19:47
Post up some pics of what you were cutting Big Fish. I'd love to see them.


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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 19:55

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 19:55
Sorry Kevin. I dont have any photos. Been 20 years since I moved from Vic to Cairns. Had quite a few redgum logs that were 2 meters in diameter. The big Husky cut biscuits about 400mm long and we just grabbed splitter and split wood from the outside edge , going around till there was no more to split. I actually enjoyed it very much. Didnt have to make many cuts to get a few tonne of wood!
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Follow Up By: KevinE - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 21:52

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 21:52
Ah, the penny has finally dropped! (for me)

I couldn't work out why you were so keen on Husqvarnas, or big 120cc saws!

20 years ago, we had 80 series Landcruisers too!

The world has moved on Big Fish. We use smaller chainsaws that would put your old 120cc saws to shame blocking down a big tree! They're light, fast & will cut your 2M diameter tree quicker, and they're fun to use.



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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018 at 15:54

Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018 at 15:54
.
Kevin...... "11chainsaws"???....C'mon, 10 is enough for anyone!!! Lol
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: KevinE - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018 at 08:56

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018 at 08:56
Nope! Sometimes have to pool chainsaws with other contractors on big jobs.

And I don't even burn firewood. I definitely don't take a chainsaw out bush.

I'm currently looking to buy another saw, just for palms.

I have 4 hedge trimmers too (shock horror lol!)
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 18:50

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 18:50
We carry a Victa 40V 16" electric chainsaw which we find very satisfactory.

The blurb says the battery is good for 120 cuts, but they don't say what kind of wood or size. In practical terms, it is way more than sufficient for our modest firewood needs. It has been indispensable on tracks in the Vic High Country and elsewhere, so far adequately handling the fallen hardwood that we've had to deal with.

AnswerID: 618316

Follow Up By: mountainman - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 21:01

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 21:01
Thats a pet hate of mine.
People will only clear a track to only get their 4wd through or just make a bypass track.
And then when they claim to clear a track for the fire trucks benefit , the truck has no hope in hell getting through because they have only made it wide enough for a small car to get through.

No dig at frank
But just in general.. vic high Country observation .
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 21:15

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 21:15
Yes, mm, more than once we have widened the gap. Most times it would not have been difficult to do it right in the first place.
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Follow Up By: CKG - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 10:07

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 10:07
I hear you!

I reckon they clear the track just wide enough to get their 4 foot wide Suzuki 4wd through!
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 10:17

Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 10:17
Mountainman with all the laws and crap today you can probably still get fined for track clearing or just bringing a chainsaw into a park. Also every little bit you move means a bit less the fireies have to move when they need to so it makes their job a bit quicker or are we obligated to spend most of our time completely clearing tracks. Some of the timber gets quite large and most don't have the gear to remove it or are putting themselves at risk of being injured doing so there are a lot of different scenarios to consider so as mentioned something is better than nothing unless you have a lot of spare time to just drive around clearing tracks at your own expense.
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Reply By: Member - Lyncol - Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 20:59

Sunday, Apr 15, 2018 at 20:59
Thanks everyone for your input , it seems the reciprocating saw could be the way to go. We use wood for cooking as we prefer this to gas and yes we probably destroy some small creatures habitats but do our best not to disturb to much. The reason for eg. Dewalt is that being a tradie I have that brand. We only will use this when camping for cutting longer logs . Fantastic photos Stephen makes you want to get out in the Aussie Bush now !
AnswerID: 618321

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 11:58

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 11:58
I'd think about a reciprocating saw carefully because they are not as good for cutting upwards i.e. when a tree etc is laying a track or when a fallen branch is under downward force then you may need to from bottom up such that you don't jam the blade by cutting to far down.
Its also harder to apply pressure on the blade into the cut.

I guess mainly due to maintenance required on our 4wd property I would probably clear several trees a week and for a long time it was petrol saws
but as per other posts on this site we moved to battery chainsaws some years ago when the technology made them practical.

I have used the Aldi garden line brand which is 36v with 14" bar and this seems to have been a good compromise between power required and weight/battery life.

While not as powerful the battery saw means you can get more work done because it doesn't need to be started which becomes tiring in petrol saws after a few dozen cuts.

The battery saw can be recharged from our Patrol and its much safer in that it can be positioned in tricky areas (even overhead) without a motor running.

P.S. 36v is about right for this stuff, 18v doesn't quite have power weight balance and while unlikely 54v and higher begins to have electrical saftey issues


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Reply By: CKG - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 10:18

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 10:18
I find myself completely torn between my love of a campfire and limiting my impact on the habitat we drive so far to see.

My preference is to camp in the places less visited - there is often a lot of wood in these sites and the impact is relatively low.

I sometimes find myself in popular campsites where falling twigs are collected for firewood before they hit the ground and the only wood is standing dead trees that you have to drag 200m to the campsite. It's these campsites where the impact is high and by continuing to scrounge for wood I am making it worse.

I generally try and find some wood in a spot where there's plenty before I get to the campsite.

I carried a small 2str chainsaw all the way around the country and only used it a few times as it felt like I was having a bigger impact and didn't like the noise telegraphing that some bastard is destroying habitat.
AnswerID: 618331

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 11:43

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 11:43
The question is 'how about recharging' when out for a few weeks away from 240v power on tap in c/van parks etc ....
AnswerID: 618332

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 12:44

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 12:44
I use a small inverter (300W MSW) and the proprietary Victa charger. I have enough battery capacity and solar support for an occasional recharge. The solar I have for the fridge anyway and the others take up no more room and are lighter than a can of fuel for a 2 stroke.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 14:20

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 14:20
Hi Alloy c/t

We have a pure sine wave inverter permanently mounded on the side of the frame of our rear draw system.

It charges everything from camera batteries, computers, the rechargeable battery on our reciprocating saw and anything else that need 240v to charge it.

We just plug what ever in when travelling in usually witching less than an hour, the item is fully charges and ready for more action.



Cheers




Stephen
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Follow Up By: tonysmc - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 16:27

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 16:27
Ryobi have a charger that plugs into the car. Chargers up to 18v batteries, so I suppose it's just an inverter set up for its batteries.
https://www.bunnings.com.au/ryobi-one-14-4-18v-dual-chemistry-car-battery-charger_p6210405
So no fuel fumes or oil leaks with a reciprocating saw.

Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 20:45

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 20:45
My Makita 18V batteries charge easily from a 300W inverter plugged into a good battery with good wiring.
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Reply By: Member - Lyncol - Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 21:11

Monday, Apr 16, 2018 at 21:11
Obviously an interesting topic so thanks again for your input. We do carry a small petrol chainsaw (the wife won it at golf yes a chainsaw) and have used this a few times especially clearing tracks prefer to do this than make a new one ,of course depending on the size! We often see old camp fires with long branches half burnt sticking out of the ground, not into that so when we drag branches back I’m looking to cut them so reciprocating saw seems to be the go and you don’t need alot to cook a meal. We also dig a pit for our fire and after cooking we burn scraps,tins basically anything then in the morning collect what’s left and crush it put it into our canvas bin bag , no smells from rubbish and very little of it.
AnswerID: 618346

Reply By: Keith B2 - Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018 at 05:20

Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018 at 05:20
I have and EGO 56V chainsaw with a 14 inch bar and am very impressed with it. It gives me about 45 minutes cutting time and, with the fast charger it recharges in 30 minutes.
I recharge via an Anderson plus running off the 200 watt solar on the roof of the truck.
Thee main appeal for me was that it does everything a petrol unit will do without having to carry an extra fuel. And it's super quiet.
Keith
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AnswerID: 618349

Reply By: Ron N - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 00:53

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 00:53
A good sharp axe still works just fine for me - and it keeps you fit, reduces the total flora and fauna damage, and it doesn't need batteries, chargers, petrol, 2-stroke mix, spark plugs, or spare saw chains!

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 618398

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 08:38

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 08:38
Whats an "Axe". ?
Dave.
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Follow Up By: ian.g - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 11:29

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 11:29
As the original post says "Our forefathers used a axe" still can't see any reason not to use one today, also keeps the rediculously large fires that some travellers insist on having in check.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 11:32

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 11:32
Maybe we need to instigate some serious training upgrades?

Suggested course -

1. Axes, their methods of construction, their operation, and care of

2. Safety around axes

3. Important things to avoid when using axes

4. Storage of axes to prevent accidental use, or theft

5. What to do, if you injure yourself with an axe

6. How to remove splinters from body parts

7. How to select axe handles that don't produce splinters

8. How to treat blisters caused by excessive axe use.

There will be a need for an assessment of the education levels of the trainees to ensure that trainees are educated to a suitable level, to enable them to grasp the intricacies of axe use.

This may mean some trainees may not make the grade. Do not consider this course rejection as a reason to become depressed.

It is not uncommon for potential trainees - particularly those brought up in the power saw era, to be totally overwhelmed by the amount of information needed to be acquired, to enable them to become fully-qualified axe-users.

Thank you for your attention.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: ian.g - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 11:45

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 11:45
As you have pointed out a serious OH&S issue, perhaps would be easier to just not let people not trained already, loose in the bush. I feel that a "Trained" person with a axe can gather sufficient wood for a fire quicker than most will get their chain saw going let alone find and cut their firewood.
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Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 12:29

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 12:29
Ah... Ron N, you neglected to include a weight training programme, in the weeks prior to being permitted to actually lift or, dare I say, swing an axe, without risk of injury.
Kerry W (WA)
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 20:52

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018 at 20:52
I've had a Makita 36V Chainsaw for the past 2 years. Awesome bit of gear, but batteries interchange with the other Makita tools we take away - a small 18V drill, an angle grinder, a blower (my wife likes to blow the dust off the tailgate) and the Makita vacuum cleaner (for the caravan).
None of this is essential but we like to take most of it depending on where we are going.

In the past I took an eggbeater type hand drill; a bowsaw to cut wood, and a dustpan and broom. But the world has changed and if you already have the Makita stuff, then may as well use it.
AnswerID: 618418

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 11:26

Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 11:26
.
Phil, you don't take a Makita lawnmower?

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 22:49

Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 22:49
Good point Allan.
But unfortunately my wife is the owner of the lawnmower and hers is a Bosch 36V that she got for mothers day a few years back :-)
(Its true!)
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Follow Up By: Genny - Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 11:49

Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 11:49
Brave man! :)
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Reply By: Ron N - Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 23:43

Friday, Apr 20, 2018 at 23:43
I can still remember when the old man owned a British-made, Douglas Tree-Clearer!

My God, what a widow-maker, and amputation device, those things were!

A 4 foot diameter, deadly-sharp saw blade, that spun at high speed on the end of a long section of tube, right in line with the operator - and with only a strip of thin metal for a saw guard, for operator protection!

They would peel off huge chunks of timber, that would demolish the saw guard, and then hit the operator!

Of course, you could rotate the saw blade 90 degrees and cut horizontally, too!
If you did that, they specialised in kicking back out of the cut, and taking the legs off bystanders! - or the operator!

I reckon ours only got used a few dozen times before the old man decided it was the most dangerous "investment" he'd ever made - and he found someone to take it off his hands!

Douglas Tree-Clearer - 1952

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 09:47

Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 09:47
We had one of those, Ron. They were in regular use by contract wood cutters in the Western District of Victoria in the 50's and 60's. Ours had an optional " log grip" that stopped the smaller logs flying back and taking out the operator's legs.

Why contract wood cutters? At the time in that district there was still a lot of land clearing to be done. The contractors paid the farmers for access to timber, then sold the cut timber as fence posts and also as fuel for the local butter factory. (Not all the timber was green. A lot of it was standing dead wood and fallen dead limbs from the ring-barking programs of the 20's - big red gums.)

Ironically, in that district in more recent times many farmers have replaced much of that tree cover, partly due to government incentives (carbon credits or whatever) and partly due to a realisation that the land had been over cleared in days past.
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Follow Up By: ian.g - Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 10:42

Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 10:42
Was also a brand around at the same time called a Hargon, just as dangerous and was responsible for a few deaths. Were popular amongst railway sleeper cutters. Have seen some powered by Subaru water cooled flat four motors, very powerful and also very quick.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 13:14

Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 13:14
I remember two brands were popular in our district, Ronaldson-Tippett and Coopers. The generic name for the device was " swing-saw".

"Widow-maker" might have been more appropriate.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 13:21

Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 13:21
Ian - That's right, although the name was spelt Hargan. They were called either the Hargan Barrow Saw or the Hargan Mobile Power Saw.
These were powered by a BSA motor, and I think they were the first on the power saw market, in 1949.

These things were also known as a drag saw, and a swingsaw - probably because they swung around, when you least expected them to!!

HCVC - Hargan power saw

Another version was built by Mobilco (no relation to Mobil oil). The name came from Mobile Industrial Equipment Ltd Company.
I've seen Douglas's and Mobilco's, but I've never seen a Hargan.

Hargan power saw in action

Mobilco built a range of models - the Junior, the Model M, the Model B, the Bush King, and the Model C, are just some that I can remember.

This bloke has a Mobilco, but it's had so much modification, including a re-power, that it hardly resembles the original Mobilco.

Modified Mobilco power saw

Mobilco saw - 1952

Mobilco Bush King - 1953

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 18:03

Saturday, Apr 21, 2018 at 18:03
.
There are some fearsome looking weapons there Ron.
If one of those horizontal blades jammed, the whole machine would likely swing around.

The forestry industry use some circular sawblades in their machines but they are well shielded and the operator is well away in a cabin.

Cheers
Allan

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